Sherwin Williams White Duck (Palette, Coordinating & Inspirations)

Sherwin Williams White Duck (SW 7010) Paint Color Review & Pics

Are you looking for a creamy pastel base for your house? One with a balanced warmth that puts it in the more neutral category? Well, you may have your answer in the Sherwin Williams White Duck.

Regarding neutral and versatile paint colors, Sherwin Williams White Duck SW 7010 has always sat in the top 5 spots on my list. The paint color boasts a unique blend and just-perfect depth, making it an ideal option for everything from cabinets and walls to some of my exterior sidings.

However, if you are currently planning your interior design project, you may have many questions about this paint color: What color is it? What pairing colors can you use? How does light affect Sherwin Williams White Duck SW 7010?

You are in luck—the sole focus of this detailed guide is to answer these questions and more. Read more to understand Sherwin Williams SW 7010 better.

Table of Contents

What Color is Sherwin Williams White Duck (SW 7010)?

Manufacturer Sherwin Williams
LRV 74
RGB R: 229 G: 223 B: 210
Hex Value #e5dfd2
Color Collections Finest Whites, Timeless White, Living Well

Sherwin Williams White Duck is a pastel & neutral paint color that leans towards greige when you observe it closely. However, to the seasoned interior designer, White Duck is more of a hybrid of cream and greige.

Greige blends beige and gray, while the cream is a more yellow-based color. Therefore, if you have north-facing light, White Duck SW 7010 will look greige while maintaining a tight cream base. In the south-facing light, your White Duck SW 7010 will look more cream without looking too yellow.

RGB of Sherwin Williams White Duck

The RGB shows the combination of red, green, and blue that makes a specific paint color. The RGB scale runs from 0 to 255. In the case of Sherwin Williams White Duck, the paint color combines red: 229, green: 223, and blue: 210.

LRV of Sherwin Williams White Duck

Interior designers use the LRV scale to measure the light reflected by a specific paint color. The light reflectivity value is a scale that runs from 0 to 100—at 0, we have pure black reflecting 0 percent light, while at 100, we have pristine white reflecting 100% light.

White Duck sits in the off-white range, with an LRV of 74. The color reflects 74% light, 26% less light than true White.

Is Sherwin Williams White Duck a Warm or Cool Color?

Sherwin Williams White Duck features warm tones. It combines greige and cream colors.

While greige does have some cool gray, warm beige dominates. Warm yellow dominates the cream tone. Therefore, Sherwin Williams White Duck is a warm paint color.

Sherwin Williams White Duck Undertones

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Molly Winn Photography for Southern Living

White Duck is a more neutral paint color—its undertones are also neutral. In certain lighting conditions, however, you may view some yellow, green, pink, and orange undertones. However, expect the paint color to look primarily neutral.

Sherwin Williams White Duck Color Strip: Sherwin Williams White Duck Color Comparisons

Sherwin Williams White Duck Color Strip

Sherwin Williams White Duck vs. Alabaster (SW 7008)

Sherwin Williams White Duck vs. Alabaster (SW 7008)

White Duck and Sherwin Williams Alabaster lean on the neutral side. Both colors also fall in the off-white range; however, their LRV varies, with Alabaster reflecting 8% more light with an LRV of 82.

Both paint colors have a hint of yellow in their undertones. White Duck and Alabaster lean on the warm side of the color scale.

Both colors will work well in a dark light room—however, you should expect Alabaster to perform slightly better. Alabaster’s higher LRV absorbs less light than White Duck, making it ideal for darker rooms.

Sherwin Williams White Duck vs. Shoji White (SW 7042)

Sherwin Williams White Duck vs. Shoji White (SW 7042)

Like Sherwin Williams White Duck, Shoji White SW 7042 combines greige and cream tones, warming both colors.

See also  Sherwin Williams Reflection (Palette, Coordinating & Inspirations)

Shoji White and White Duck SW 7010 reflect the same amount of light—they have an LRV of 74. Both paint colors sit in the off-white range, reflecting 26% less light than pure White.

Both colors have very neutral undertones. However, one common undertone the two colors seem to carry is green. However, you will be hard-pressed to view the green undertone—it shows in only a few lighting conditions.

Sherwin Williams White Duck vs. White Goose (6183-11)

Sherwin Williams White Duck vs. White Goose (6183-11)

While Sherwin Williams White Duck combines cream and greige tones, Sico’s White Goose has gray as its primary tone. Both colors, however, are highly neutral—it will be hard for you to identify an undertone in either.

Both Sico White Goose and White Duck sit in the off-white range. However, White Goose reflects more light with its LRV of 81.54% compared to the White Duck, which reflects 74%.

Sico White Goose and Sherwin Williams White Duck vary in RGB combination. White Duck combines red: 229, green: 223, and blue: 210; White Goose combines red: 235, green: 233, and blue: 228.

Sherwin Williams White Duck vs. Oyster White (SW 7637)

Sherwin Williams White Duck vs. Oyster White (SW 7637)

Like Sherwin Williams White Duck, Oyster White is also an impressive off-white paint color. However, while White Duck balances greige and cream tones, Oyster White leans more on the greige side of the scale.

Both colors have warm dominant tones. However, White Duck is slightly warmer than Oyster White, meaning White Duck SW 7010 may work better in cooler north-facing rooms than Oyster White.

The off-white range has an LRV range running from 73 to 82. Interestingly, however, Oyster White reflects 2% less light than White Duck with its LRV of 72. Therefore, Oyster White does not exactly sit in the off-white range—instead, it sits on the borderline of the off-white colors, although in some cases, some interior designers may give it the off-white label.

Sherwin Williams White Duck vs. Natural Choice (SW 7011)

Sherwin Williams White Duck vs. Natural Choice (SW 7011)

Both Sherwin Williams Natural Choice and White Duck are neutral paint colors. When used in a room, they both tend to make attractive backdrops for all types of décor.

Like Sherwin Williams White Duck, Natural Choice combines both cream and greige. However, in Natural Choice, the yellow color in cream seems more dominant, making Natural Choice SW 7011 more yellow than Sherwin Williams White Duck.

The two colors are in the off-white range. Natural Choice has an LRV of 73, while White Duck has an LRV of 74. Both paint colors boast slightly matching undertones, with yellow/green-yellow undertones dominating.

Sherwin Williams White Duck vs. Pearly White (SW 7009)

Sherwin Williams White Duck vs. Pearly White (SW 7009)

Pearly White is just one tone lighter on the color strip than White Duck. Both colors sit in the off-white range—however since Sherwin Williams Pearly White SW 7009 is lighter, it reflects 3% more light with its LRV of 77.

Both colors fall on the warmer side, given their dominant yellow tone. However, they are also slightly neutral—meaning they do not swing too warm. They are more balanced and boast some hints of coolness.

Sherwin Williams Pearly White and White Duck have very neutral undertones. The two paint colors will always display a neutral appearance unless you are in the right lighting conditions.

Sherwin Williams White Duck vs. Eider White (SW 7014)

Sherwin Williams White Duck vs. Eider White (SW 7014)

Sherwin Williams Eider White is four tones darker on the color strip than White Duck. Sherwin Williams Eider White, however, has a more dominant gray in its greige tone—this puts it in the off-white gray paint color category.

Both Sherwin Williams White Duck and Eider White are warm colors. However, they feature balanced warmth.

As you would expect with a slightly darker color, Eider White reflects less light than White Duck. However, With Eider White boasting an LRV of 73 and White Duck with an LRV of 74, the two colors are in the off-white range.

Sherwin Williams White Duck vs. Snowbound (SW 7004)

Sherwin Williams White Duck vs. Snowbound (SW 7004)

On the Sherwin Williams paint color strip, Snowbound SW 7004 is six shades lighter than White Duck. As you would expect with a lighter color, Sherwin Williams Snowbound reflects more light with an LRV of 83. This puts White Duck at the lower end of the off-white range while Snowbound is on the higher end.

Both are warm paint colors. They have a yellow tone that gives them their warmth, with the gray in their greige tone balancing out their warmth. However, while you will find yellow, gray, green, and orange undertones in White Duck, Snowbound more readily displays the violet-pink undertone.

Sherwin Williams White Duck vs. Origami White (SW 7636)

Sherwin Williams White Duck vs. Origami White (SW 7636)

Like Sherwin William White Duck, Origami White also sits in the off-white range. While White Duck reflects 74% of the light, Origami White reflects 2% more with its LRV of 76. The two colors are ideal for dark-lit rooms, as they can create interest since they absorb minimal light.

They balance out the greige and cream tones—they are neither too crisp nor too creamy. However, they both have a warm yellow—therefore, they are both warm colors.

While you can use either color outdoors, they are not the best options. The fact that White Duck absorbs only 26 percent light and Origami White absorbs 24 percent light means the two colors may look too washed out in extreme light.

See also  Sherwin Williams Incredible White (Palette, Coordinating & Inspirations)

Sherwin Williams White Duck vs. Pure White (SW 7005)

Sherwin Williams White Duck vs. Pure White (SW 7005)

Most interior designers confuse Pure White SW 7005 with the true White with an LRV of 100%. Pure White is an off-white paint color with an LRV of 84.

White Duck sits on the lower end of the off-white range, while Pure White is on the higher end. Pure White is five shades lighter than White Duck on the Sherwin Williams paint color strip.

While White Duck features some gray that tends to soften its warmth, Pure White features a little black. Both paint colors, however, fit on the warm side of the color scale.

Sherwin Williams White Duck vs. Creamy (SW 7012)

Sherwin Williams White Duck vs. Creamy (SW 7012)

Sherwin Williams Creamy is one of the more popular warm white paint colors. As its name suggests, SW Creamy is a creamy paint color—like White Duck; it has cream as its dominating tone.

White Duck and Creamy have yellow as their primary tones. Therefore, White Duck and Sherwin Williams Cream SW 7012 are warm colors—they, however, have some cool undertones that balance out warmth, ensuring they are not too warm.

Creamy SW 7012 and White Duck SW 7010 are in the off-white range, with Creamy on the higher end and White Duck on the lower end. On the LRV scale, Creamy reflects 81% of the light, while White Duck reflects 74%.

Sherwin Williams White Duck Color Palette

Coordinating Colors for White Duck SW 7010

Coordinating Colors for White Duck SW 7010

Sherwin Williams White Duck is one of the few versatile off-whites. However, while the color does pair well with numerous colors, some make it stand out more positively than others. I have explored many options when using White Duck SW 7010 in my rooms—my most preferred options have always included the following:

Sherwin Williams Worldly Gray (SW 7043)

Sherwin Williams Worldly Gray (SW 7043)

Worldly Gray works for a contrasting look that is not too overboard. Like Sherwin Williams White Duck, Worldly Gray is a neutral color with a more dominant gray tone.

Worldly Gray is a darker color—unlike White Duck which reflects 74% of the light you throw at it, Worldly Gray will reflect 57%. Combining the two colors provides a balance—Worldly Gray absorbs the excessive sunlight, keeping White Duck from getting washed out.

Worldly Gray is a warm gray paint color. The fact that White Duck is also a warm paint color makes the combination less ideal for an already warm south-facing room. However, put the two colors in a north-facing room with a cold feeling, and you will enjoy a warmth boost.

Sherwin Williams Tradewind (SW 6218)

Sherwin Williams Tradewind (SW 6218)

With Sherwin Williams White Duck being warm, you may want to introduce a cool paint color into your interior design. Tradewind—one of my favorite blue colors—is an ideal way to do this.

Sherwin Williams Tradewind is a cool blue paint color. It adds some personality to any room—when you combine its slightly lower LRV of 61 with its impressive appearance, you can be sure that the color will make any room with White Duck on its walls stand out.

You may be worried that Tradewind may carry too much blue—this is not the case. Tradewind boasts some cool gray that balances the blue, ensuring it does not steal the show in your house.

Sherwin Williams Moody Blue (SW 6221)

Sherwin Williams Moody Blue (SW 6221)

Want to add a cool blue whose undertones match some of those in White Duck SW 7010? Moody Blue (SW 6221) could offer you desired results.

Moody Blue is a dark, mid-tone color combining green and blue tones. Although it falls on the darker end of the scale, it is neither too dark nor too light, which gives it a more balanced feel.

Beautiful and timeless, the paint color pairs well with off-whites like White Duck, adding character in bright rooms where Duck White would wash out. Moody Blue has an LRV of 27, which absorbs much of the light that would wash out White Duck with its LRV of 74.

Sherwin Williams Mega Greige (SW 7031)

Sherwin Williams Mega Greige (SW 7031)

If you want to implement a monochromatic design with White Duck, you could use Mega Greige as your pairing color.

Mega Greige matches Sherwin Williams White Duck in one of its tones—both colors have a greige as a primary tone. Mega Greige is warm like White Duck—however, the paint adds a welcoming feel.

The warm colors of Mega Greige and White Duck SW 7010 may not work for south-facing rooms. However, the two paint colors always deliver excellent results in north-facing rooms, balancing the coolness in the north-facing rooms.

Sherwin Williams Urbane Bronze (SW 7048)

Sherwin Williams Urbane Bronze (SW 7048)

Nowadays, people always gravitate towards light, bright paint colors—that’s probably why Sherwin Williams White Duck was your first option. However, deep, rich paint like Urbane Bronze has its place too.

Urbane Bronze is a nature-inspired paint color that gives your space that rich and luxurious feel. It belongs to the brown color family—however, it carries a ton of gray shade. While Urbane Bronze is warm by default, the gray undertone paint color tends to bring a bit of cool to it.

Urbane Bronze has an LRV of 8, meaning that it is best suited for a well-lit room—otherwise, dim-lit rooms could make it dull. However, pairing it with White Duck allows it to enjoy all the light reflected by SW 7010, making it stand out in slightly dark rooms.

Sherwin Williams Naval (SW 6244)

Sherwin Williams Naval (SW 6244)

Naval is a versatile paint color that performs well in coastal and Victorian styles. Pair it with crisp whites or off-whites—in this case, White Duck—and get an impressive room with balanced warmth and cool.

See also  Sherwin Williams Greek Villa (Palette, Coordinating & Inspirations)

Naval is a deep navy blue that boasts a rich and saturated quality. While it may appear as dark as some black colors, a second look gives the impression of brightness resulting from an LRV of 4%. However, Naval is too dark to perform well in a dimly lit room—when pairing it with White Duck, you have to ensure the lighting is sufficient to ensure Naval does not lose its character and become dull.

Naval is a cool color. Pairing with White Duck brings down the warmth in SW 7010, balancing it out and ensuring a pleasant environment.

Sherwin Williams Anonymous (SW 7046)

Sherwin Williams Anonymous (SW 7046)

Anonymous SW 7046 has always performed well when paired with White Duck—the effect is even more substantial if you love brown and intimate grays. Sherwin Williams Anonymous SW 7046 is a neutral, dark-toned paint color boasting gray-green undertones.

When paired with White Duck, it brings a sense of elegance into the home, refining the appearance of the walls. It is more reflective than Naval, with an LRV of 20. Therefore, the paint color may perform well in a darker room when paired with White Duck; however, it is always a good idea to ensure the light is sufficient for the best effect.

While White Duck may push the walls away, making your space seem more significant, Anonymous SW 7046 brings the walls closer. Therefore, you may want to skip Anonymous SW 7046 when working in a tight area.

Sherwin Williams White Duck Complementary Color

Sherwin Williams White Duck Complementary Color

Sometimes your interior design project wants you to combine two opposite colors. When working with White Duck SW 7010, you will need its complementary color.

White Duck’s complementary color sits opposite it on the color wheel. If you mix White Duck with the complementary color, the mixture will lose its hue, leaving you with a grayscale color like black or White.

The complementary color for White Duck has the hex value of #1A202D—currently, this color does not have an official name. However, the closest paint color to this hex value carries the name Eigengrau.

What Trim Colors Go with Sherwin Williams White Duck SW 7010?

What Trim Colors Go with Sherwin Williams White Duck SW 7010

In the years I have worked with Sherwin Williams White Duck, the paint color works with many trim colors. However, when selecting the best of the best, I always go with the following options:

Sherwin Williams Repose Gray (SW 7015)

Sherwin Williams Repose Gray SW 7015

When working with White Duck, it’s impossible to go wrong with neutral gray trims—an ideal option here is Repose Gray. This paint color guarantees some degree of warmth—however, it is not as warm as White Duck.

Repose Gray has an LRV of 58. The fact that it reflects less light than White Duck allows it to stand out—your trims will not blend in with White Duck and disappear. However, the color will not be shouting so loudly that it takes all attention away from your beautiful White Duck walls.

The color boasts a group of undertones, with the most visible ones including greige, gray, and brown. However, do not worry—you won’t have to worry about the color turning into a chameleon, as most of these paint colors only show in specific lighting conditions.

Sherwin Williams Liveable Green (SW 6176)

Sherwin Williams Liveable Green SW 6176

Liveable Green may be a perfect trim color if you love a combo of gray and green. Liveable Green boasts green as its primary tone, just like its name suggests. To add to Green’s coolness, it has a gray that matches well with the greige in Sherwin Williams White Duck.

The paint color does reflect less light than White Duck, with an LRV of 61. Therefore, the color will always give off a distinct appearance—however, the paint color is not so loud and will always allow your White Duck to get enough attention.

Sherwin Williams puts Liveable Green SW 6176 in the Living Well color collection, suggesting that adding it to your trim creates a relaxing environment.

Sherwin Williams Tricorn Black (SW 6258)

Sherwin Williams Tricorn Black SW 6258

Trimming off-whites with a color that almost looks extra opposite has always produced impressive results in my rooms. When working with off-whites, black has always worked—making Tricorn Black SW 6258 a perfect choice.

Tricorn Black SW 6258 sits on the same table with the most popular black paint colors in the Sherwin-Williams color collection—this is all for the best reasons. Tricorn Black is a timeless paint color that brings that moody, dramatic, bold, and full-bodied feel to any room.

It has an LRV of 3; therefore, you may expect it to attract a lot of attention. However, I would not recommend using it in a dark room as low light can make it look too dull.

Sherwin Williams White Duck Benjamin Moore Version

Sherwin Williams White Duck Benjamin Moore Version

Maybe you want to try the Benjamin Moore brand but still wish to maintain the same look offered by Sherwin Williams White Duck SW 7010. In that case, your best option will be Benjamin Moore Gray Mist (962).

Benjamin Moore Gray Mist combines red: 227, green: 223, and blue: 210 on the RGB scale. Benjamin Moore Gray Mist has an LRV of 74—the same light reflectivity value as Sherwin Williams White Duck.

How Does Light Affect Sherwin Williams White Duck?

North-facing light—the coolest light—brings out the coolness in White Duck. Although White Duck is a warm paint color, north-facing light makes it lean slightly to greige, lowering its warmth.

South-facing light is generally bright and warm. This type of light draws out the warmth in White Duck and makes the paint color lean more beige or creamy.

Best Rooms to Paint Sherwin Williams White Duck SW 7010

Sherwin Williams White Duck in Living Room

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Sherwin Williams White Duck in Kitchen

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Sherwin Williams White Duck Exterior

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Overview

Sherwin Williams White Duck (SW 7010) ticks all the boxes in the interior design world. The paint color has an LRV of 74—this works well with all lighting conditions, including dim lights.

Moreover, White Duck leans more on the neutral side. Although it has some warmth, the color does not get so warm that it makes your space uncomfortable. Moreover, since White Duck works well with cool blues, greens, and more, you can always balance its warmth with these cooler shades.

While you may want to use White Duck outdoors, you may risk washing out because of its high LRV. However, I have seen some people use White Duck outdoors with excellent results.

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Blacksburgbelle

Hello, my name is April and I'm the creator of blacksburgbelle.com. I'm passionate about colors and painting, and my website is dedicated to exploring the world of paint and color.

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